Have you ever seen anything like this?

What is it?

What is it?

On a camping trip to Western Victoria some years ago, I came across a tree that had a most remarkable feature. While I have seen this response from these types of trees many times, never quite so beautifully immortalised!

The drips were quite solid, so it had been like this for quite a while. But they were crystal clear, no dust had settled or stuck while the resin was wet or as it had dried.

I was intrigued by the way the bottom drop never quite let go and the one on the right seemed to be defying gravity as it hardened!

Anyone want to have a guess as to the type of tree and the reason for the drips? What about a suggestion as to why the drop on the right is not falling down, but across?!

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This entry was posted in Australia, Favourite things, Odds & ends, Wildlife and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to Have you ever seen anything like this?

  1. agogo22 says:

    Reblogged this on msamba.

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  2. I know I’m going to sound extremely hopeless but the first thought that struck me when I saw this was that it reminds me of a family. The youngster has grown up and is leaving home(the little drop falling straight down). Dad( on the left) is ready to let him chose his path, however Mom is heartbroken and is stretching out for a last hug !

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  3. adinparadise says:

    No, I have no idea. Fascinating though. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • Madoqua says:

      Isn’t it lovely? I would have got a few more pics (only managed one) but the family were anxiously waiting to go somewhere and could not understand my fascination with a tree!

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  4. The reason for the drips is the gash in the tree it’s dripping from. The bottom drip never ‘let go’ because gravity wasn’t enough to overcome the properties of the sap to cling to itself. Gravity got the bulk of that ‘drip’ down to the bottom, but it just couldn’t break the ‘string’ holding it up.

    The one on the right could be many things. My guess would be the drip had a soft spot off center (perhaps it was warmer on that side?), and the sap continued to try to drip down, pushing the ‘bottom’ to the right as the soft spot expanded downward.

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    • Madoqua says:

      Yes, you are right! It is great that it all ran down just so far and then stopped! Almost like stopping time.
      I like your theory about the sideways drop. I did not look closely enough to see what was going on on the underside or other side, that may have given a few more clues.

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  5. scrapydo says:

    This is awesome! I know that the trees drip “glue” when something cuts through the bark. I think it could be an acacia kind of tree

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  6. Helen says:

    I’ve seen it in South Australia, mainly on the Golden Wattle. It can be really beautiful to look at. They remind me of syrup!

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  7. Ian Fraser says:

    Rivetting photo – thanks for sharing it. I largely agree with CM re the ‘sideways flow’, but wonder if it’s more simply that most of the sap is flowing from the trunk above the ‘stalactite’ – ie to the left of it – and thus building up when it gets to the tip on that side. As to the species, we’d really need to see some foliage and know more precisely where it was (eg could be a different answer if it was Little Desert or the Grampians), but probably something like A. dealbata or mearnsii. I don’t know what they’re called in the US, but mimosa was what the Romans called species from North Africa, and that’s the name used in most of the rest of the world; ‘wattle’ is a home-grown Australian name.

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    • Madoqua says:

      Ian, thanks all the info! The tree was a Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii). The photo was taken on the banks of the lower Murray River and these trees are common there.
      I do like your suggestion how the sideways drip got to be there!

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  8. mudlips says:

    I love it! What a wonderful sight. And, yes! no dust or debris in it how

    ps- FYI, acacia and mimosa here in US are two different trees. While the mimosa and acacia and they are both members of the subfamily Mimosoideae, so very closely related, they indeed are different genus and species. Here, the mimosa or silk tree genus is in Albizia not Acacia.

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    • Madoqua says:

      Mudlips, thanks for clarifying the Mimosa/Acacia name usage in the US. We too have different genera and many species for each, but common names such as Mimosa can be confusing. I had someone respond to a post on Acacias and they called them Mimosa, so I wasn’t sure.
      Interesting that both South Africa and Australia use the term Wattles as a common name for the Acacias.

      Like

  9. bluebrightly says:

    You posted an interesting photo and got back a fascinating discussion – from psychological interpretations to physics & botany – I love it!

    Like

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